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Locomotives Gallery

A collection of Galleries of Locomotives

Choose from 68 pictures in our Locomotives collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then Featured Locomotives Print

On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then

On Sunday 3rd July 1938, Mallard raced past Little Bytham at 123 mph (198 kmh), then over the next 1and a quarter miles (2 km) its speed rose until for one quarter mile (0.4 km) stretch it touched 126 mph, (203 kmh). Mallard had achieved a world speed record for steam traction. It is seen here outside the National Railway Museum in York in 1993. The A4 Pacific class Mallard was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley (1876-1941), the chief engineer of the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER)

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City of Truro 4-4-0 City class steam locomotive, No 3440, 1903. This Featured Locomotives Print

City of Truro 4-4-0 City class steam locomotive, No 3440, 1903. This

City of Truro 4-4-0 City class steam locomotive, No 3440, 1903. This locomotive was designed by William Dean for the Great Western Railway and built at Swindon in 1903. It is reputed to be the first locomotive to travel at a speed of over 100 mph, reaching a speed of 102.3 mph at White Ball, Somerset, in 1904. The City of Truro was withdrawn from general service in 1931, but after full restoration in the 1950s, has been used to haul occasional special trains. Here, the locomotive is shown hauling a special excursion train on the York to Scarborough line, c 1970s

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Wylam Dilly, with its sister locomotive Puffing Billy, is the Featured Locomotives Print

Wylam Dilly, with its sister locomotive Puffing Billy, is the

Wylam Dilly, with its sister locomotive Puffing Billy, is the earliest surviving locomotive in the world. Wylam Dilly was built by the inventor and colliery official, William Hedley (1779-1843) in 1813 for use at the Wylam Colliery near Newcastle. He patented his design for railway traction engines using smooth wheels on smooth rails. The two locomotives were photographed in 1862, when they were finally taken out of service

© Please read our licence terms. All digital images must be destroyed unless otherwise agreed in writing.